GM SUVs a Fire Danger, Not Safe Indoors

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GM is telling customers to park their SUVs outdoors after issuing a recall on 189,000 vehicles.  The recall is in relation to power window switches in the driver’s side doors that can catch fire.  This is GM’s third attempt to recall vehicles affected by the defect.  So far this year the company has issued a record setting 60 recalls, affecting almost 29 million vehicles.

The latest recall affects vehicles sold in North America, and includes 2006 and 2007 year models of the Chevrolet TrailBlazer, GMC Envoy, Buick Rainier, Isuzu Ascender and Saab 97-X.  Despite the immediate risk associated with these defective vehicles, GM is saying that parts necessary for repairs will not be ready until October at the earliest.

Problems with the power window switches became apparent in early 2012 when consumers started complaining to federal agencies about fires in the driver’s side door.  A report from 2008 tells of one woman who saw her 2006 TrailBlazer parked in her driveway go up in flames.  Firefighters were called, and after the blaze was extinguished, they identified the ignition point as located in the driver’s side door.

GM claims that the problem relates to the protective coating around the power window switch, which can rust and corrode in colder states where salt is often used on the roads during icy conditions.  Despite a government pressured recall by GM in August of 2012, affecting 278,000 vehicles, thousands of automobiles are still on the road, putting consumers in life-threatening danger.  So far, GM and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration have received over 200 complaints related to these window switches.  Twenty-eight fires in these SUVs have been reported, but it is believed that there are many more that have gone unreported.  If you or a loved one has suffered losses as a result of unexplained fire in your vehicle, immediately contact the experts at Houssiere, Durant & Houssiere, LLP for your free legal consultation.

Derek RobinsonGM SUVs a Fire Danger, Not Safe Indoors